Not my Lululemon yoga pants too?!

When two of my favorite millennials texted on Sunday night to tell me I had to watch Hasan Minnaj's latest episode of his Netflix series Patriot Act, I first asked "who is Hasan Minnaj?" Realizing he was one of the correspondents on Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, I oriented my boomer mindset and tuned in.


And you can too.



There are a lot of reasons to watch "The Ugly Truth of Fast Fashion":


- It's truly hysterical (I'm hooked on Hasan)

- The facts in this story are true

- A 29 minute sketch will inform us all on how the largest fashion companies

in the world, in particular Zara and H & M, have contributed to waste, poor labor

conditions, and environmental havoc.

- Even our beloved Lululemon brand gets "dressed down".


Speaking of Lululemon, I'm wearing mine as we speak.


The majority of Lululemon athletic wear is made of luon, a primary fabric found in most of Lululemon's performance wear products, from yoga pants to headbands.

Luon, which is trademarked by the brand, is 86 percent nylon and 14 percent Lycra. It's an important part of Lululemon's secret sauce. 


Synthetic fabrics such as Polyester, Acrylic, Nylon, Spandex and Acetate are all made from nonrenewable fossil fuels. The production of these synthetic fabrics is emission intensive and environmentally degrading.


Lululemon's Luon pants are made by Eclat Textile Co. in Taiwan, the same supplier that Lululemon has used for the past decade. 


In other words, the performance and style hugging athletic wear getting me out the door each morning to stay fit and healthy is also not so great for our planet.

WAIT A MINUTE. THEY CLAIM TO BE SUSTAINABLE. THEY'RE TRYING TO IMPROVE.


Aren't we all? Yes. In fact, that's why I'm writing about conscious fashion. Sustainability in the fashion industry is still being defined, and the algorithm isn't perfect.

It's hard to sort out the facts from the claims when it comes to fashion and sustainability. One of the best resources I've discovered to help with this evaluation is a tool used by investors called Censible, which generates millions of Environmental Social and Governance (ESG) data points to measure how stocks, mutual funds and ETFs perform on issues like carbon emissions or gender diversity.


Here's the Censible skinny on Lululemon

Where do I go from here? I am going to think twice before I buy the latest design from my favorite athletic brand and could even find an equally high performing product that could also outperform them in design and sustainability. I'll keep you posted.


Thank you, Hasan Minhaj. Add me to your watch list.







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